For the Love of Paws Rescue, Giving Back

For the Love of Paws Rescue, Giving Back

by Amy D’Andrea CVT, Pet Emergency Education, LLC Founder One of the programs we are proud to offer through Pet Emergency Education, LLC is the rescue/shelter fundraiser program.  For any qualifying class of 10 or more people, Pet Emergency Education will donate a portion of the registration fees back to the rescue and/or shelter.  Shelters and rescues can host the classes themselves or anyone who wants to organize a Pet CPR class as a fundraiser can have the proceeds donated to benefit their favorite animal charity.  When we are asked to hold a fundraiser we really look forward to getting to know the organization that the funds will be donated to.  The recipient organization must be a registered 501(c)3 charity with the IRS and their mission must benefit the wellbeing of animals in some way.  We have had the pleasure of working with many wonderful rescues since the company began and here is the story of just one of them. For the Love of Paws (4TLOP) is a 501(c)3 foster-based nonprofit animal rescue organization and a true labor of love.  It was founded in December 2014 by six friends who met in animal rescue and decided to venture out on their own with a vision of a small animal rescue organization that could expand beyond serving furry animals and could

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Teaching Pet CPR to Inmates at Sterling Correctional Facility

Teaching Pet CPR to Inmates at Sterling Correctional Facility

by Amy D’Andrea CVT, Founder of Pet Emergency Education, LLC Recently my business partner, who also happens to be my husband, and I were asked to volunteer our time teaching pet CPR to the inmates (offenders) participating in the Prison Trained K9 Program at the Sterling Correctional Facility in Sterling, Colorado.  A few months ago we taught a class at Disco Dogs, in conjunction with Freedom Service Dogs, in Englewood, CO.  One of the participants had mentioned the prison program to us and her affiliation with this exceptional program.  She put the director of the prison training program in touch with us so that we could have a conversation about possibly coming in to teach the trainers, many of which are serving life sentences, our PetCPR+ certification program.  The director of the prison training program, Darlene McInnes, felt that our program, which teaches life saving first aid techniques including safe handling/transportation of sick and injured pets, first aid for animal emergencies and of course current methods of animal CPR, would be greatly received by the men of the Sterling Correctional Facility.  As strong supporters of any organization that improves the lives of any animals, we jumped at the chance to experience such a unique opportunity. The Colorado Correctional Industries (CCI), Prison Trained K-9 Companion Program (PTKCP) is a program which

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It’s a Dog’s Life- 4 Great Off-Leash Dog Parks Outside Denver

It’s a Dog’s Life- 4 Great Off-Leash Dog Parks Outside Denver

by Greg D’Andrea, Executive Director Pet Emergency Education, LLC As co-owners of Pet Emergency Education, LLC, a national Pet CPR and First Aid Certification company, my wife and I are, as one might expect, passionate about animals. We’re especially passionate about our constant companion, Cootie, a Jack Russel/Miniature Pinscher mix. Two years ago we moved from Rhode Island to Littleton, Colorado and quickly discovered that with so many great places to walk and hike with your pet, it really is a dog’s life here in Colorado. Although most places do require that you keep your 4-legged friend on a leash, there are plenty of places where they can run fast and free. Here are 4 (of many) exceptional off-leash dog parks located a short distance outside of Denver that we enjoy taking Cootie to. Wynetka Ponds Bark Park: This well maintained neighborhood dog park is conveniently located on the corner or W. Bowles and S. Lowell Blvd in Littleton. There are 2 spacious fenced in areas, with one side at a time closed to allow the grounds to recuperate from lots of activity.  Within the fenced in areas there are picnic tables, doggie drinking fountains and rubber fire hydrants for your dog to, well, you know. Oh, and poop bags are provided.  This park is great for socializing your pet

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What To Do When Your Dog Has a Grand Mal Seizure

What To Do When Your Dog Has a Grand Mal Seizure

by Laura Capra I was lucky the first time my dog had a seizure.  I have a background in the therapeutic field and I knew exactly what was happening to him and I was able to keep my head about me to help him. It was still scary and unnerving, but it wasn’t the end of the world for him (or for me!)  Here are some tips on how to get your dog (and yourself) through his seizure: Take a deep breath.  It is going to be a very long 30-60 seconds ahead of you. Do NOT try to move him and/or stop the seizure movements – you can’t.  It’s ok. Don’t go near his mouth, if his jaws are involved in the seizure you risk a very high chance of getting unintentionally bit. Move things out of the way that he may knock into and hurt himself on.  If things are too heavy to move, place a pillow or a blanket between him and the furniture. Expect that he will lose his bladder control.  I place a towel on his belly to help absorb some of the urine.  It may be gross, but it’s NORMAL! Expect that he will foam at the mouth – this is actually just extra saliva since he is not able to swallow during the seizure.

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Important Considerations When Choosing a Pet CPR Certification Program

Important Considerations When Choosing a Pet CPR Certification Program

by Amy D’Andrea MEd, CVT For many years, the American Heart Association has developed and disseminated guidelines on how best to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on people experiencing cardiac arrest. Even though the skill of performing CPR is vital in emergency situations where warranted, no such evidence-based guidelines on Pet CPR existed in the veterinary world. Studies have shown that as a result of this lack of formal animal CPR methods, while more than 20 percent of human patients who suffer cardiac arrests in the hospital survive to go home to their families, the equivalent figure for dogs and cats is less than 6 percent.   The first evidence-based recommendations to resuscitate dogs and cats in cardiac arrest was developed recently through a collaboration of veterinarians, professional veterinary emergency organizations and veterinary educational institutions.  This method aims to standardize how CPR is performed on dogs and cats, ultimately leading to improved outcomes and higher survival rates. Confidently knowing what is the best method of Pet CPR to use on dogs and cats when they are in cardiac arrest requires anyone that wants to become trained in animal CPR to do their homework.  If you google pet CPR you will get pages and pages of search results enticing you to attend a variety of training programs in Pet CPR.  Some classes are 3

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4 Things to Do to Prepare for Your Professional Pet Sitter

4 Things to Do to Prepare for Your Professional Pet Sitter

by Alex Dundon CVT, Owner of A&R Critter Care When you leave your pets in the care of a professional pet sitter, you should be able to travel with peace of mind. At this point, you’ve done your research and found a professional that is a good fit for you. They are insured, are certified in or have Pet First Aid experience, and have appropriate forms and a contract so that you are covered and feel good about leaving your fur babies. The last steps before you leave home is to make sure your pet sitter has all the necessities to take the best care of them! 4 Things to Do to Prepare for Your Professional Pet Sitter! At The Meet & Greet First, it’s always a good idea to have a Meet &  Greet session where your pet can meet his sitter. This is so we can meet you (and your fur babies), and you/they can meet us! Not every pet sitter is a good fit for every family, but when it works well, it’s a beautiful thing! If for some reason your gut tells you that there is something not right, go with this feeling. Find another sitter, because it’s better to be safe than sorry. Professional sitters will completely understand when it’s not an ideal fit (we follow our guts just

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Vacationing with your Pet

Vacationing with your Pet

by Amanda Hackerott RVT, Certified Pet CPR Instructor As our pets are members of our family, it makes sense that more and more of them are going on holiday or taking a vacation with their humans. We, as animal parents, are willing to go through the veterinary exams, health certificate paperwork, and jump all the other hoops to be able to take Fluffy to Spain. With all the hard work that it takes in planning a vacation and making all the ends tie up, we don’t want to forget basic travel safety. Traveling with a pet is much like traveling with a young child. You must do all the packing, all of the itinerary planning, handle the financials, keep the passports safe. There are a couple of particulars worth sharing on pet specific travel safety: Make Copies of Everything Vaccination records, prescription orders, medical history, microchip info- make at least one copy to travel with and leave the original documents at home. Make sure microchip information is current and up to date with your contact numbers. Contact info and phone numbers- make a master set of contact information before you leave for the trip; this will save you time Googling your vet’s phone number when you’re on another continent. Take Lots of Photos You want to make a photo log

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Bird Emergency Preparedness

Bird Emergency Preparedness

by Amanda Hackerott RVT Birds are just such fun pets and are coming up on the list of most commonly owned pets in American homes. They, as well as any other animal in your house, should have an escape plan in case of an emergency. Being prepared can increase the chance of escape, decrease the trauma or loss of life and reduce the stress that both pets and humans can experience in an emergency. There are two big things that can help with preparing you and your bird for an emergency situation. One thing that I recommend to all of my bird-owning clients is that they get their bird used to being caught and handled in a bath towel. Veterinary offices commonly use towels to catch and restrain birds; the towel offers support and comfort as well as ease of use by the human. In a house fire emergency, being able to catch your bird directly from the cage and wrap him in a towel will hopefully prevent or minimize any smoke inhalation (which can be deadly for a bird), any burns or other trauma. One good way to get your bird to enjoy the towel’s presence is to lay the towel out in an area where the bird plays or forages. Throw some high value seeds or other treats

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Toxic Plants

Toxic Plants

As the snow begins to melt and the spring air warms, spending time outdoors starts to increase.  Knowing your plants and which ones are poisonous is crucial to keeping your pets safe.  Cats love to gnaw on green leafy things, and some dogs insist on eating anything growing.  Our pets don’t know the difference between a blade of grass and a potentially deadly plant.  As a gardener, you might be shocked by some of the stock plants found on the poisonous list.  For instance, Caladium, which is an easy to grow plant, is toxic to pets and humans.  This plant is found throughout Florida landscapes because of its easy care and aesthetic looks. Top 10 Poisonous Plants A list of the top ten common plants includes shrubs and trees, indoor plants, and wildflowers.  People need to keep the following plants out of reach of their fur kids: Caladium. Otherwise known as Elephants Ear or Pink Cloud. Lilies. Stargazer, Tiger, and Easter. Dumbcane. Could be a house or outdoor plant. Larkspur. Purple wildflower. Foxglove. Garden Flower. Sago Palm. An ornamental tree found in warmer climates. Oleander. Ornamental shrub. Yew. Ornamental tree and dogs like to play with the fallen branches. Autumn Crocus.Wildflower. Rosary Pea. An invasive outdoor plant. by Jessie Miller Certified Pet CPR Instructor Pots Plants and More is a website that has

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Second Dog Syndrome

Second Dog Syndrome

By Katherine Novak, Certified Pet CPR Instructor Are you thinking about getting a second dog?  Let’s go over the reasons for this decision.  Is it because you feel like your dog needs someone to keep him company during the day while you are gone?  Is it because you are gone 8 hours a day, or sometimes more?  Is it because when you get home in the evening you are too tired to give your number one dog the attention that he deserves?  If you answered yes to any of these questions, please rethink your decision to bring another dog into your life. Here is what usually happens. The time that you do have at home with your dog is now shared with a stranger (your new dog). Your dog #1 never has you to himself. Since dog #1 does not pick dog #2, there are often personality clashes. Now we have two dogs that are not getting their needs met. You have two dogs fighting over your attention when you get home. You have double the vet bills. Now… here is a better solution. Use the money that you would have spent on the second dog and hire a dog walker for your dog, and/or send him to doggy daycare one or two days a week. Make sure that you

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