HCCTC Public Health and Safety Students Learn Pet CPR and First Aid

HCCTC Public Health and Safety Students Learn Pet CPR and First Aid

The Huntingdon County Career and Technology Center in Huntingdon, PA learned how to provide emergency care to dogs and cats during a class training session with Pet Emergency Education Advocate Jennifer Hampton recently. Jennifer along with her service dog Wellie spoke to the class about pet first aid, CPR and basic life support skills and how important prompt emergency response is in order to allow time to get the animal safely to a veterinary clinic.  Public health and safety instructor Crist Fellman invited Jennifer and her dog to speak at the class.  Fellman stated “There have been lots of times where we’ve had to pull a family dog or cat out of an emergency.  You do all sorts of odds and ends you think might be the right thing to do and hope for the best.  This is the first training I’ve seen on how to do it the right way”. The class was featured in the Huntingdon Daily News and Pet Emergency Education was proud to have the opportunity to work with the students. Credits: April Feagley, Huntingdon Daily News

Why Pet CPR Certification RENEWALS are so Important

Why Pet CPR Certification RENEWALS are so Important

by Amy D’Andrea MEd, CVT Knowing how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a pet (CPR) can help save a life.  Taking a Pet CPR Certification class will provide all of the information and training you will need to help an animal in a life threatening emergency, but is this enough?  CPR is a form of emergency care that can be performed by a well trained individual, but the field of Emergency Medicine is always changing.  In 2012 a study that was done in conjunction with 900 emergency veterinarians across the county discovered groundbreaking methods to perform animal CPR.  These new techniques increased survival rates, as well as found ways to increase oxygen distribution throughout the body.  Some of the differences in these new methods of animal CPR include changing the position an animal lies in for compression, compression to breath ratio and assessment measures.  Significant changes were made to the previous way that animal CPR was performed, resulting in a new, more successful method. The way that animal CPR was performed just 4-5 years ago is very different then the most current methods recommended today.  It makes me very nervous when a Pet CPR Certification company promotes “lifetime” certification or no renewals for their certifications.  How is that possible when today’s techniques and steps evolve into even better techniques and

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